Mediterranean Diet Recipes

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As we prepare for Heart month in February, remember to take care of your Valentine’s heart. Adopting some Mediterranean diet attributes  could be very helpful and delicious. There is more to the Mediterranean Diet than just  food, it is a way of life that includes diet, activity, and the social habits from the population residing in the countries bordering the Mediterranean Sea. The Heart Study and the Lyons Diet Heart Study tested the diet benefits. The American Heart Association Science Advisory strongly recommended the adoption of the Mediterranean-style diet in the US in 2001.The diet emphasizes the consumption of vegetables, fruit, whole grains, fish and plant foods rich in omega-3 fatty acids. Food sources of omega 3 polyunsaturated fat include green leafy vegetables, dark chocolate, soybean/canola oil, flax seed, flax oil, chia seeds and omega 3 eggs.  Here is a recipe I prepared for my event with Dr. Whitney, Cardiologist from BryanHeart.  

Curtis Stone’s Lentil Soup with Vegetables                     Serves 6
All you need:
½ cup lentils
1 ¼ cup  vegetable stock, to puree the lentils (generous) Kitchen Basics
2 tbsp olive oil
2 carrots, peeled and diced
1 ½ celery stalks, diced
3 shallots, peeled and diced
1 leek, white only, diced
3 garlic cloves, peeled and chopped
1 cup  lentils
5 cups water
1 bay leaf
1 fresh thyme sprig
8 leaves of kale, thinly sliced  or cabbage
¼ teaspoon salt
¼ teaspoon freshly ground black pepper.
Croutons to garnish

All you do:
For the Puree:

  1. Place the lentils and the generous 1 ¼ cups/325 ml stock in a large saucepan and cook over a low heat until all the liquid has evaporated and the lentils are tender, about 25 minutes.
  2. Remove from the heat, transfer the lentils to a blender and process, adding enough extra stock as needed, until smooth.
  3. Set the puree aside until required.

For the soup:

  1. Heat the olive oil in a pan, add the carrots, celery, shallots, leek and garlic and sweat for 5 minutes or until the cabbage is cooked.
  2. Add the lentils, bay leaf and thyme and the measured water and bring to a boil. Simmer for about 25 minutes, or until lentils are soft.
  3. Skim any impurities from the surface of the soup, add the kale. Cook for a another 5 minutes or until the kale is cooked.
  4. Check the seasoning, add the reserved puree, garnish with croutons and serve.

Nutrition facts per serving: 160 calories, 5 g fat, .5 g saturated fat, 0 g trans fat, 0 mg cholesterol, 270 mg sodium, 23 g carbohydrates,6 g fiber, 4 g sugar, 7 g protein. Daily values: 220% vitamin A, 100% vitamin C, 10% calcium, 20% iron.

I like the flavors and spices of the region like olive oil, feta cheese, oregano, tomatoes, garlic and olives. Here is a recipe for your grilled chicken or fish.

Mediterranean Chicken Serves 8

All you need:
2 tablespoons Mrs. Dash tomato basil or original (Aisle 5)
• 4 tablespoons non-fat plain yogurt (Dairy)
• ½ teaspoon Hy-Vee ground coriander (Aisle 5)
• 1/8 teaspoon Hy-Vee black pepper (Aisle 5)
• 1½ pounds Smart Chicken boneless, skinless breast or (Meat)
¾-inch thick yellow fin tuna steaks (8-3 ounce portions)
• Hy-Vee no-stick cooking spray (Aisle 5)
• 1½ cups chopped seeded tomato (2 small tomatoes) (Produce)
• 1/4 cup chopped green onions (Produce)
• 3 tablespoons chopped fresh parsley (Produce)
• 1 tablespoon capers, drained (Aisle 3)
• 1 tablespoon Grand Selections extra virgin olive oil (Aisle 4)
• 2 tablespoon Hy-Vee lemon juice (Produce)
• 1/2 teaspoon bottled minced garlic (Produce)
• 12 chopped pitted Hy-Vee kalamata olives (Aisle 3)

All you do:

1. In a large bowl, combine Mrs. Dash, yogurt, coriander and pepper. Add chicken or fish pieces and coat chicken well. Cover and refrigerate for at least 1 hour.
2. Heat a large nonstick skillet over medium-high heat. Coat pan with cooking spray. Add chicken or fish to pan; cook 4 minutes on each side or until desired degree of doneness.
3. While chicken or fish cooks, combine tomato, green onions, parsley, capers, olive oil, lemon juice, garlic and olives. Serve tomato mixture over chicken or fish.
Adapted from Michelle Powers, Cooking Light JULY 2005

Nutrition Facts per serving: 130 calories, 4g fat, 0g saturated fat, 40 mg cholesterol, 240 mg sodium, 3 g carbohydrate, 1 g fiber, 2 g sugar, 21 g protein. Daily values: 8% vitamin A, 15% vitamin C, 2% calcium, 10 % iron

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Becky and Dr. Whitney cooking up a storm in this photo.

The following recipe is a great mixture of vegetables and would be perfect for a lunch.

Mediterranean Wrap

All you need:
1 red onion, sliced
1 zucchini, sliced
1 eggplant, sliced
1 can black beans, no salt added
1/4 pound fresh mushrooms, sliced
1 red bell pepper, sliced
1 tablespoon olive oil
¼ teaspoon ground black pepper
4 whole grain tortillas or 4 Gluten-free Mission flour tortillas
1/4 cup goat cheese
1/4 cup basil pesto Classico brand is GF
1 large avocado, sliced

All you do:
1. Heat a grill pan or skillet over medium heat. Place the seasoned, slightly thawed veggies in preheated pan. Stir and cook until tender, about 15 minutes.
2. Spread each tortilla with 2 tablespoons goat cheese and pesto. Divide avocado slices among the shells. Top with veggies.
3. Fold in the bottom of each tortilla and roll up into a snug wrap. Grill on a hot iron skillet for a warm version.

Nutrition Facts per serving: 340.9 calories, 13.5 g fat, 2.7 g saturated fat, 542.5 mg sodium, 47 g carbohydrate, 20.1 g fiber, 19.1 g protein.

 

 

Bike-driven smoothie maker at Kahoa!

smoothie maker

Last week I visited with Kahoa Students and Eric Vacek, PE teacher at Kahoa Elementary School. The students rode a bike-driven smoothie maker. Our recipe included:
1 cup Orange juice
1 cup 1% milk
1 cup Hy-Vee frozen strawberries
1 cup Hy-Vee yogurt, vanilla or strawberry flavored. After about a minute of fast pedaling, we had smoothies! We served about 300 smoothies, enjoyed by all.

What about Wine?

In moderation and as part of an overall healthy diet, the short answer is yes!
Because of its alcohol content and non-alcoholic phytochemicals (naturally occurring plant compounds), wine has been shown to reduce the risk of heart disease and certain cancers and slow the progression of neurological degenerative disorders like Alzheimer’s and Parkinson’s diseases. However, if you drink more than what’s recommended, your health benefits are lost and your health risks go up.
For men, no more than two 5-ounce glasses of red or white wine, 12 ounces of regular beer or 1 1/2 ounces of 80-proof distilled spirit per day is considered safe and effective; for women, no more than one drink of the same amount per day.
The health benefits of wine
o The primary cardiovascular benefits from red and white wine, hard liquor and beer is
that moderate amounts can raise your good cholesterol (HDL cholesterol) and thin your blood.
o Non-alcoholic phytochemicals in wine, such as flavanoids and resveratrol, act as antioxidants and prevent molecules known as “free radicals” from causing cellular damage in the body.
o Resveratrol has been shown to prevent blood clotting and plaque formation in arteries by altering lipid profiles and plasma viscosity.
o Red wine provides much more resveratrol compared to white. That’s because the longer the skin is kept on the grape during the wine-making process, the greater the concentration of resveratrol in the wine. Wines made in cooler climates have greater amounts of resveratrol too. Thus, red wines from cool climates have the most resveratrol.
The negative side of wine
Certain medical conditions may be worsened by the consumption of wine, so it’s vital you seek the advice of your personal physician.

But because there does seem to be some health benefits to drinking wine, I have started a Food and Wine Tasting 101 Class. The first class meets on Thursday, April 30 at 6:30. Registration is required, call the store to register at 402-467-5505. Cost is $20.00. We will feature 5 wines and have perfectly paired appetizers like Skewed Greek Salad, Smoked Gouda and Mushrooms, Cheese-stuffed Dates and Dark Chocolate Truffles.
http://www.hy-vee.com

This information provided to you by your Lincoln Hy-Vee dietitians.
It is not intended as medical advice.
Please consult a medical professional for individual advice