Diabetes Prevention Program

Apple with heart.PNG

Diabetes Prevention Program                             

 Tuesday, November 14, 2017       5:30 pm- 6:30 pm       

Is your glucose level higher than normal? Have you had gestational diabetes?

If so, you might have prediabetes. Come learn about our Hy-Vee Diabetes Prevention Program, a 1 year program utilizing the curriculum from the Center for Disease Control and Prevention.

This program is based on research study that showed that lifestyle changes including weight loss and activity were the best method to reduce the risk of Type 2 Diabetes.

Attend group meetings for education, support and assistance from Hy-Vee Dietitian and Lifestyle Coach Becky Guittar. Sessions will take place at LES.

There is a fee for the program. Not suitable for individuals with diabetes.

Register with Becky at bguittar@hy-vee.com or call her at 402-467-5505.

 

Here is the information from the National Institute of Diabetes and Digestive and Kidney Diseases,  US Department of Health and Human Services and the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention.

The Diabetes Prevention Program (DPP) was a major multicenter clinical research study aimed at discovering whether modest weight loss through dietary changes and increased physical activity or treatment with the oral diabetes drug metformin (Glucophage) could prevent or delay the onset of type 2 diabetes in study participants. At the beginning of the DPP, participants were all overweight and had blood glucose, also called blood sugar, levels higher than normal but not high enough for a diagnosis of diabetes—a condition called prediabetes.

The DPP found that participants who lost a modest amount of weight through dietary changes and increased physical activity sharply reduced their chances of developing diabetes. Taking metformin also reduced risk, although less dramatically. The DPP resolved its research questions earlier than projected and, following the recommenda-tion of an external monitoring board, the study was halted a year early. The researchers published their findings in the February 7, 2002, issue of the New England Journal of Medicine.

DPP Study Design and Goals

In the DPP, participants from 27 clinical centers around the United States were randomly divided into different treatment groups. The first group, called the lifestyle intervention group, received intensive training in diet, physical activity, and behavior modification.  By eating less fat and fewer calories and exercising for a total of 150 minutes a week, they aimed to lose 7 % of their body weight and maintain that loss.

The second group took 850 mg of metformin twice a day. The third group received placebo pills instead of metformin. The metformin and placebo groups also received information about diet and exercise but no intensive motivational counseling. A fourth group was treated with the drug troglitazone (Rezulin), but this part of the study was dis-continued after researchers discovered that troglitazone can cause serious liver damage. The participants in this group were followed but not included as one of the intervention groups.

All 3,234 study participants were overweight and had prediabetes, which are well-known risk factors for the development of type 2 diabetes. In addition, 45 percent of the participants were from minority groups—African American, Alaska Native, American Indian, Asian American, Hispanic/Latino, or Pacific Islander—at increased risk of developing diabetes.

Prediabetes is a condition in which blood glucose levels are higher than normal but not high enough for a diagnosis of diabetes. Prediabetes is also called impaired glucose tolerance (IGT) or impaired fasting glucose (IFG), depending on the test used to measure blood glucose levels. Having prediabetes puts one at higher risk for develop-ing type 2 diabetes. People with prediabetes are also at increased risk for developing cardiovascular disease.

Prediabetes is becoming more common in the United States. The U.S. Department of Health and Human Services estimates that about one in four U.S. adults aged 20 years or older—or 57 million people—had prediabetes in 2007. Those with prediabetes are likely to develop type 2 diabetes within 10 years, unless they take steps to prevent or delay diabetes.

DPP Results

The DPP’s results indicate that millions of high-risk people can delay or avoid develop-ing type 2 diabetes by losing weight through regular physical activity and a diet low in fat and calories. Weight loss and physical activity lower the risk of diabetes by improving the body’s ability to use insulin and process glucose. The DPP also suggests that metformin can help delay the onset of diabetes.

Participants in the lifestyle intervention group—those receiving intensive individual counseling and motivational support on effective diet, exercise, and behavior modi-fication—reduced their risk of developing diabetes by 58 percent. This finding was true across all participating ethnic groups and for both men and women. Lifestyle changes worked particularly well for participants aged 60 and older, reducing their risk by 71 percent. About 5 percent of the lifestyle intervention group developed dia-betes each year during the study period, compared with 11 percent of those in the placebo group.

Participants taking metformin reduced their risk of developing diabetes by 31 percent. Metformin was effective for both men and women, but it was least effective in people aged 45 and older. Metformin was most effective in people 25 to 44 years old and in those with a body mass index of 35 or higher, meaning they were at least 60 pounds overweight. About 7.8 percent of the metformin group developed diabetes each year during the study, compared with 11 percent of the group receiving the placebo.

Points to Remember

  1. The DPP showed that people at risk for developing diabetes can prevent or delay the onset of diabetes by losing a modest amount of weight through diet and exercise. DPP participants in the lifestyle intervention group reduced their risk of developing diabetes by 58 percent during the study.
  2. DPP participants who took the oral diabetes medication metformin also reduced their risk of developing diabetes, but not as much as those in the lifestyle intervention group.
  3. The DPP’s impact continues as new research builds on the study’s results to find the best ways to delay, prevent, and treat diabetes.

Details

The sessions will meet weekly for 16 weeks, with a  week break during the holidays. They start mid-November on Tuesdays at 5:30 p.m.

After 16 sessions, we will meet every other week for a month and then monthly for 5-6 sessions.

There is nutrition and health topics at each session.  Email Becky at bguittar@hy-vee.com or call her at 402-467-5505 for any questions.

 

Advertisements